Rapid Worldbuilding with Probuilder

Rapid Worldbuilding with ProBuilder

ProBuilder is totally free available through the package manager.
If you’re using 2017 or 5.6 you’ll get critical bug fixes. However, from 2018 onwards there’s more support, using 2018.1.0b3 I dealt with a considerably severe crash bug, so update to b12 IMO.
Polybrush and Progrids are things you’ll have to go get individually from Unity.
To replace Probuilder objects with polished geo you can play around with the Unity FBX exporter

Real Quick Prototyping Demo

  • Main Probuilder window (found by going to tools>probuilder>probuilder window) – has tools and Probuilder is designed so that you can ignore it when you’ a new to using Probuilder
  • Face, Object, etc. mode – will allow you to touch only the variable selectable
  • A good way to learn the tool is to go through the main probuilder window and check the shortcuts
  • It really helps to keep things as simple as possible from the get go. Don’t add tons of polys
  • Shape selector will help you quickly make stuff
  • Connect edges and insert edge loop
  • Holding shift to grab multiple
  • ‘R’ will give you scale mode
  • Extrude is a fantastic way to add geometry
  • Grid Size – keep at 1 for 1 meter this is important for avoiding mistakes when creating geo and knowing your angles
  • Use the ortho top down view to see if your geo fits your grid
  • Detach face settings is a way to split geo selected but it’s still part of your item
  • Detach face using a different setting to create a new game object
  • Pivot point needs to be rejigged often (solutions: object action or set it to a specific element using “Center Pivot”)
  • center pivot and put it on the grid by using progrids
  • Settings changes become the default
  • Use the Poly Shape tool to spin up a room + extrude quickly
  • Merge objects
  • think in terms of Quads
  • try selecting to vertices and connect (Alt + E) them
  • select hidden as a toggle is a great option, because in 3D you are seeing an orthographic projection so you will click on the thing that is drawn closest to the camera!
  • Crafting a doorway, can be done using extrude and grid meter changes, toggle the views (X, Y, and Z) to help with that
  • hold v to make geo snap; this will save you time later on
  • Alt+C will collapse verts (as in the ramp option where the speaker started with a cube)
  • Weld vs. Collapse — weld great for merging to hallways, or collapse which is more like pushing all verts within a specific distance together
  • Grow selection and smooth group

Polybrush Stuff

  • Add more detail with loops or subdivide (smart connect)
  • Polybrush will let you sculpt, smooth, texture blend, scatter objects, etc.
  • Modes like smoothing
  • todo explore something prefabs
  • N-gons are bad because everything is made up of tris

Texturing stuff

Open up the UV editor
  • By default, everything is on auto which means that on in-scene handles toggle
  • When you’re prototyping this allows you to not use fancy toolbar stuff

Question

  • Why is progrids helpful? Short answer: if you’re not super familiar with 3D modeling and creation software (i.e. Maya) you can create simple geo without leaving Unity editor.
  • Why would you be obsessive about making sure your geo fits your 1 meter grid size? Short answer: This helps you avoid errors with geo creation such as horrid angles and hidden faces.
  • Can you talk a little bit about automation with Probuilder?

Reblog: Google creates coffee making sim to test VR learning

Most VR experiences so far have been games and 360-degree videos, but Google is exploring the idea that VR can be a way to learn real life skills. The skill it chose to use as a test of this hypothesis is making coffee. So of course, it created a coffee making simulator in VR.

As explained by author, Ryan Whitwam, this simulation proved more effective over the other group in the study that had just a video primer on the coffee-making technique herein.

Participants were allowed to watch the video or do the VR simulation as many times as they wanted, and then the test—they had to make real espresso. According to Google, the people who used the VR simulator learned faster and better, needing less time to get confident enough to do the real thing and making fewer mistakes when they did.

As you all know, I have the Future of Farming project going right now with Oculus Launch Pad. It is my ambition to impart some knowledge about farming/gardening to users of that experience. Therefore I found this article to be quite intriguing. How fast can we all learn to crop tend using novel equipment should we be primed first by an interactive experience/tutorial. This is what I’d name ‘environment transferable learning’ or ETL. The idea that in one environment you can learn core concepts or skills that transcend the tactical elements of the environment. For example, a skill learned in VR that translates into a real world environment, maybe “Environment Transferable Skills” or ETS.

A fantastic alternate example, also comes from Google, with Google Blocks. This application allows Oculus Rift or HTC Vive users to craft 3D models with controllers, and the tutorial walks users through how to use their virtual apparatuses. This example doesn’t use ETL, but we can learn from the design of the tutorial nonetheless for ETL applications. For instance, when Blocks teaches how to use the 3D shape tool it focuses on teaching the user by showing outlines of 3D models that it wants the user to place. The correct button is colored differently relative to other touch controller buttons. This signals a constraint to the user that this is the button to use. With sensors found in the Oculus Touch controllers, one could force the constraint of pointing with the index finger or grasping. In the example of farming, if there is a button interface in both the real and virtual world (the latter modeled closely to mimic the real world) I can then show a user how to push the correct buttons on the equipment to get started.

What I want to highlight is that it’s kind of a re-engineering of having someone walk you through your first time exercising a skill (i.e. espresso-making). It’s cool that the tutorial can animate a sign pointing your hands to the correct locations etc. Maybe not super useful for complicated tasks but to kind of instruct anything that requires basic motor skills VR ETL can be very interesting.

via Did you enjoy this article? Then read the full version from the author’s website.